Chinese Painting

Chinese painting is one of the oldest continuous artistic traditions in the world. The earliest paintings were not representational but ornamental; they consisted of patterns or designs rather than pictures. Early pottery was painted with spirals, zigzags, dots, or animals. It was only during the Warring States Period(403-221 B.C.) that artists began to represent the world around them.

Painting in the traditional style is known today in Chinese as guó huà (国画), meaning 'national' or 'native painting', as opposed to Western styles of art. Traditional painting involves essentially the same techniques as calligraphy and is done with a brush dipped in black or colored ink; oils are not used. As with calligraphy, the most popular materials on which paintings are made of are paper and silk. The finished work is then mounted on scrolls, which can be hung or rolled up. Traditional painting  is also done in albums and on walls, lacquerwork, and other media.

In this course, the students will learn how to paint a range of popular subjects using Traditional & Contemporary Chinese Brush Painting techniques. Projects gradually increase in difficulty, and feature such subjects as swallows, bamboo, wild orchids, plum blossoms, pandas, horses, peonies and more.

Course Duration and Class Size

Three ten-week courses will be run from January, April and September each year. Each week will have one session of one and half hours. Class sizes will be limited to approximately five to ten students.

Chinese Painting  “Shirmp” by Master Qi Baishi. (See the picture above)

 

Thanks for sharing!
© 2014 UCD Confucius Institute. All rights reserved.
View Introduction Video Of UCD Confucius Institute
( 观看都柏林大学孔子学院视频介绍 )